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School LED Lighting

UK schools could reduce energy costs by around £44 million per year which would prevent 625,000 tonnes of CO2 from entering the atmosphere.

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Educational Environments

LED lighting solutions for schools and colleges serve demanding budgets, avoid capital outlay and reap the rewards from day one. Indoor and outdoor LED lighting for schools and colleges also sets the example and utilises the technology that students are learning about; being the change they would want to see.

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Optimized Lighting

LED lighting solutions for schools and colleges serve demanding budgets, avoid capital outlay and reap the rewards from day one. Indoor and outdoor LED lighting for schools and colleges also sets the example and utilises the technology that students are learning about; being the change they would want to see.

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Higher Illumination

LED lighting solutions for schools and colleges serve demanding budgets, avoid capital outlay and reap the rewards from day one. Indoor and outdoor LED lighting for schools and colleges also sets the example and utilises the technology that students are learning about; being the change they would want to see.

Learn More

Insufficient Morning Light

Insufficient blue light in the morning can delay the circadian clock and the delayed circadian clock can lead to health and performance problems.

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School Lighting

UK schools could reduce energy costs by around £44 million per year which would prevent 625,000 tonnes of CO2 from entering the atmosphere.

Improving energy efficiency in schools does not mean compromising the comfort of staff and students. In many cases, implementing some simple energy saving measures actually improves conditions, as well as saving money.

Both upper and lower schools are pushed to make the most of their resources, while providing a solid education for students. Being energy efficient saves money, so is an excellent way to release funds for curricular resources or facilities.

In addition to economic benefits, there are social and environmental advantages to reducing energy consumption, such as preserving fossil fuels and minimising impact on the environment. This is increasingly important to the reputation of schools, as students, teachers and parents become increasingly aware of climate change.

Moreover, actions taken to become energy efficient provide an excellent opportunity for practical learning and real-life application for students. Many energy saving actions can be undertaken or monitored by students, while the science behind it might be a great opportunity for targeted classes.

Educational Environments

In educational environments optimized lighting can have positive effects on performance, social behaviour, and also on physical health and well-being While several studies have shown that with higher illuminance levels and higher colour temperatures, pupils’ and students’ academic performance (for example the level of concentration) increased compared to standard lighting, some studies also report that with a reduction of light levels and lower colour temperature a decrease in agitation and disturbance during lessons can be achieved. It also seems that light can affect the social behaviour of children in a positive way and light might have an effect on physical health (studies have indicated that light might have an influence on parameters like blood pressure or body growth or even be able to shift the circadian rhythm). It is also noteworthy, that there is a connection between academic performance and sleep and sleepiness during school. There is a good chance that optimized lighting environments might help to improve sleepiness or sleep at night.

Optimised Light

The effects of optimized light environments on concentration

In a summary of three Dutch studies, the findings about the effect of light demonstrate beneficial effects of optimized light settings in the educational environment. All three studies used the same light system for their experimental groups, which consisted of 1000lx illuminance level and 6500K (cold white) colour temperature. For the study controls there had been (1) 600lx and 4000K, (2) 380lx and 3000K, and (3) 300lx and 3000K to 4000K. In total 197 (98, 44, and 55) pupils participated in these studies. While the second and third studies report better performance in concentration or at least a positive trend for concentration and fewer errors compared to their controls, findings of the first study report a better performance in a concentration test of the control group, nevertheless, the first study also reports an increased performance growth in the experimental group compared to the control group.

Higher Illumination

Lighting with higher illumination levels and higher color temperature shows positive effects on the level of concentration and/or oral reading fluency (ORF).

In a study with 84 pupils (grade 3, age 7 to 8) separated to four classrooms, the oral reading fluency was measured for two kinds of light conditions. Standard lighting which consisted of 500lx illuminance level and 3500K (warm white) color temperature compared to an lighting optimized for focus tasks The influence of daylight was reduced due to small or blocked windows and drawn blinds. The score for ORF was assessed at the beginning (September), the middle (January) and the completion (May) of the study. The intervention in the experimental groups took place during all focus tasks where the pupil had to read something. Children in the experimental group, the optimized lighting, started with a lower score (assessed before the intervention) and ended with a significant higher score (assessed after the intervention) in ORF compared to the children within the control group. The assessment itself took place under standard lighting for all children. Furthermore, the motivation was evaluated. Even though there have been no significant findings for motivation, there is a positive upwards trend for motivation under the optimized lighting, while the trend for motivation under standard lighting declined during the school year.

Insufficient Morning Light

Insufficient blue light in the morning can delay the circadian clock and the delayed circadian clock can lead to health and performance problems.

Beside the effects on performance, the lack of light with short wavelength causes a delay in the circadian system. The findings of this field study have investigated the effect of light on the circadian rhythm. In this study eleven adolescent teenagers (grade 8, age 13 to 14) have been examined on their change in dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) during a five-day school week. For this purpose, students had to wear orange glasses during this period of time in school to filter all blue spectral components from the environmental light. DLMO was examined before and after the intervention. To determine DLMO, a number of saliva samples were taken in the evening between 07:30 pm and 11:00 pm every 30 minutes. A significant delay in DLMO of about 30 minutes occurred in the participants after wearing the orange glasses, which indicates that a lack of short wavelength light may lead to a change in circadian rhythmicity. These findings correlate with other findings from laboratory settings. A delayed circadian clock (eveningness) can lead to disadvantages in exams and poorer academic performance. A study with 132 university students aged 20 to 22 years old, showed a highly significant positive correlation between early chronotype and better grades16. Even further, recent studies showed that a slower onset of melatonin could be a risk factor for mental health (higher possibility of depression) and physical health or health-impairing behaviours.

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